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Ensuring Sufficient Battery Power for Medication Carts

Medical carts are found in care clinics and virtually every department of a hospital, including emergency departments, intensive care units, medical and surgical inpatient floors, laboratories, phlebotomy, exam rooms, transfusion and dialysis, pharmacy, materials management, the operating room suite and its supply area, and many more.

Replacement Batteries for Lionville iPoint Medication Cart available at Batteryheads.com Lionville iPoint Medication Cart

Medication carts allow nurses to improve workflow and medication management throughout the facility.  Ensuring that the carts have sufficient battery power is essential to patient safety and efficient workflow.

A medication cart may be loaded in a either a hospital's central pharmacy or in a local medication room that may be found on an inpatient floor. It is then brought to the patient's bedside for the nurse to dispense the prescribed medicine to the patient.  With a medication cart, a nurse can go directly from one patient room to another, saving time.

According to the Veteran’s Affairs Bar Code Medication Administration (BCMA) Manager’s User Manual:  “Nursing staff administer medications to hospitalized patients via a bar code system. In general, each medication comes in an individual barcoded packet which pharmacy staff pre-load into individual patient cassettes. The cassettes, with the patients’ names on front, are loaded into a medication cart. Medication carts are equipped with computers, hand-held scanners (to scan medication and wristband barcodes), and locking medication drawers that are all powered by the cart’s battery. Medication carts should have sufficient battery life such that the cart can be moved from patient room to patient room during medication pass.

When nurses administer medications, the general process involves: 1. Confirming the patient’s identity. 2. Scanning the patient’s wristband, which contains a unique bar code, to access the patient’s medication profile and information on the computer screen. 3. Scanning the bar code on each medication packet.

BCMA automatically records the medication as “given.” Unless the nurse manually changes “given” to another option administration time is considered to be the time the patient’s wristband and medications are scanned. If the nurse is unable to administer the medications, the nurse can choose one of several options from a menu, including medication “missing,” “refused,” or “held.” The process of scanning automatically documents the date and time the medications were administered.”1

When the medication carts do not have sufficient battery power, nurses may have to administer medications late.  Without necessary battery power, medication carts must remain plugged in. With fully functioning medication carts, nurses are able to administer medications safely and on time.  Hospitals should ensure that their purchasing is efficient for patient care equipment and items.

Popular medication carts include the Metro Lionville iMed and the Metro Lionville iPoint. These carts, and others, offer the capacity for most full medication passes and allows clinicians to document electronically. This can reduce redundant tasks and offer patient information in real-time right from the medication cart.

Batteryheads supplies replacement biomedical batteries for the Lionville Medication Carts and many more at Batteryheads.com. All of our batteries are designed and manufactured to meet or exceed the quality and performance of the battery provided by the medical device manufacturer.

Medication carts allow nurses to improve workflow and medication management throughout the facility. Ensuring that the carts have sufficient battery power is essential to patient safety and efficient workflow.

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