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Replacing Your Batteries Before They Die - Being Proactive vs. Reactive

If your job includes ordering and stocking medical equipment replacement batteries, you know that frontline medical personnel and their patients depend on you. Batteries are so important to medical treatment that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration held a summer 2013 public workshop on improving the performance and safety of battery-powered medical devices.   In its workshop introduction, the FDA reported, "While many different components can potentially impact the safety and effectiveness of medical devices, the battery is one of the most critical components.","

If your job includes ordering and stocking medical equipment replacement batteries, you know that frontline medical personnel and their patients depend on you. Batteries are so important to medical treatment that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration held a summer 2013 public workshop on improving the performance and safety of battery-powered medical devices.  In its workshop introduction, the FDA reported:

“While many different components can potentially impact the safety and effectiveness of medical devices, the battery is one of the most critical components.”

Your role and what you need to know

You may already have a supply and equipment inventory process in place, but your battery stocks may be the trees lost in the forest of the equipment they power. To get a handle on managing your battery inventory, answer these three questions:

1. What is the turnover of each type of battery your organization uses?

Look at your purchase records and inventory your stock on hand. Commonsense adjustments of stocking and budgeting for future purchases will have residual benefits. If you know about your battery requirements, you have an insight into managing your battery-powered equipment.

2. Do you maintain enough batteries in your inventory to cover the normal turnover demands?

You’ll need both a safety margin as well as a method to avoid excess inventory. Again, review your past purchasing records to determine:

  • peak usage times and the need for a revised purchasing strategy
  • batteries that are routinely replaced at specified intervals, without waiting for failure
  • cost and performance comparisons between original equipment batteries and third-party suppliers
  • which devices place the biggest demands on battery power
  • the numbers, locations and potential for consolidation of battery charger unit stations
  • warranty expiration data for high-priced battery packs and chargers

 

3. What are the years of manufacture and purchase dates of battery-powered equipment along with the equipment lifetime expectancies?

If your organization’s inventory system is computerized, you have a head start on this one. You might discover potential issues or clusters of equipment obsolescence and concurrent aging that need to be addressed in upcoming budget planning.

The bottom line

Managing and replacing your batteries before they die is inherently reactive. The proactive part is the foresight and planning to keep all your medical equipment working all the time. Administrators and office managers can play a crucial role in keeping frontline medical personnel fully charged and ready for their lifesaving work.

Your resource is BATTERYHEADS

Batteryheads now offers a medical line of batteries, which meet original manufacture specs, and which offer significant cost savings. Visit our main site and dial up the first letter of your medical device manufacturer. We know you’ll be pleased with our product line, service and product warranty.

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